Week 23: Fibonacci Weaving

If I am not playing with math, then I am tangled in yarn and thinking about math. This week I combined the two and wove A small fibonacci washcloth. Fiber arts are so versatile and an insanely fun way to express mathematics. In future weeks we will look at collage (wool applique), Cantor art, etc.

Fibonacci is a sequence where you start with 0 and 1. You then add those to get 1: {0,1,1}, and then you add 1 and 1 to get 2: {0,1,1,2}, and then you keep adding the last two numbers to get the next number. Here is a comic I created for Marie’s Atlas on Fibonacci:

For weaving, you need a piece of cardboard, small loom or even a notebook card (for thread weaving). The idea here is to create any form of Fibonacci patterns in your work. For mine I did 8 for a lower border, then 1 blue, 1 white, 1 blue, 1 white, 2 blue, 2 white, 3 blue, 3 white, and so on. Below is a sample. There are tons of ways to weave this sequence. You can use different sized looms, patchwork squares with areas that equal the sequence, etc. Have fun!

Week 21: Hexagon Tessellations

I love tessellating! This week we are playing with hexagons. Learners can either draw or cut various hexagonal designs with various colors. It is fun to see what secondary patterns can occur. Do other polygons tessellate?

This is a wonderful activity to practice mindfulness and presence as you play with these shapes. It is an opportune project for students to learn single pointed mindedness.

Use lots of colors – tissue paper is also fun. I didn’t post many pictures, because I don’t like to give all the patterns away – I really love the discovery that happens with this project. A paper cutter can come in handy here if you have a large class.

Here is a template to cut from. It is also a good time to break out protractors and comapasses and play with 120 degrees (the outer angle of a regular hexagon).

In our home, we have been playing with laser cut hexagons this week; and if you are a hobbyist with a laser and interested in a set, then I have SVG files here.

Week 20: Angles within a circle

This week learners can play with angles with both grand projects and smaller art projects. There are 360 degrees in a circle or 2pi radians. Learners can draw a circle and then mark every 20 degrees (or every 30 or any factor of 360).

tick marks every 20 degrees

Factors: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, 24, 30, 36, 40, 60, 72, 90, 120, 180, 360

Once the circle and tick marks are made, learners can start connecting points by skipping a set amount (skip every 5 marks). The key here is to be consistent – make sure they skip the same number of marks with each line. The lengths of the lines should be the same, so they can use that to check each line. I like to use circular protractors, but it’s not necessary.

After creating a star, or mix of polygons, learners can color them in, create a template for sewing applique, laser cut, combine them into a mobile, and more.

Week 16: Geometric Sketching – Hummingbird

I love to incorporate drawing skills into math education. This week I encourage learners to start seeing birds (or other animals/people) as shapes. Heads are circles, torsos are ellipses, beaks are triangles, wings are long ellipses…

Sketching is a skill. A skill is something that you can master in time (think growth mindset). This week I challenge learners to start a daily doodle routine. Just doodle something (anything) for 1-2 minutes a day.

Here is an example of the activity. I will use a hummingbird as guidance, but please feel free to pick any object/bird/animal. I tried to do this as a quick sketch example:

Some of the concepts and discussions around sketching can include proportions, ratios, what shapes fit best, etc. I encourage learners to research and dive deeper into sketching skills and drills. I truly believe that art and spatial awareness can be beautifully integrated into learning math.

Additional activity: For high school students in Algebra 2 or higher, they can use Geogebra to sketch the shapes for an animal. How do you plot a circle? an ellipse? triangles? etc. Desmos can be used at a precalculus and calculus level.

https://www.geogebra.org/graphing/x6k9wnag